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Recurrent Depression and Cognitive Functioning: an Analysis of Relationships

Syunyakov T.S. 1 Vel'tishchev D.Yu. 2
1 V. V. Zakusov research Institute of pharmacology, Pfizer LLC, Moscow, Russia
2 Moscow scientific research institute of psychiatry, the branch of the National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Narcology by the name of V.P.Serbsky Minzdrava RF

Summary
Recurrent depression is linked to cognitive dysfunction that become more prominent with illness progression. This review aimed to analyze neuroscientific findings on the interaction between depressive disorder and cognitive dysfunction published in the last decade. The core mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in depression is thought to be the disturbance of functioning and connectivity in the certain brain networks and structures due to gene x environment interaction. These disturbances are translated into cognitive and emotional biases and diminished information processing ability. Most antidepressants have the potential to ameliorate cognitive and emotional biases in the short-term nut can be differentiated by the effect on the more stable disturbances. Differences may reflect distinct binding profiles and potential to induce long-term neuroplastic changes. Combination of pharmacological and psychological treatment may provide additional benefits in the amelioration of cognitive dysfunction.

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